My feelgood film -Bridget Jones Diary

Bridget: It is a truth universally acknowledged that when one part of your life starts going okay,

another falls spectacularly to pieces.

After a long week of being very busy, Being host to PeopleofLeeds on Twitter, Today I felt a bit lost, even more so when I had quite a bit to do at work and all I wanted to do was shove my head under the duvet. This is how I fix this. I write the day off and I watch this film and eat crap. it works. I just need to follow-up on a good sleep. CBT this week is concentrating on assertion and being listened to. Lets hope it works.

‘A British woman is determined to improve herself while she looks for love in a year in which she keeps a personal diary’

Bridget: …ah! New Year’s Resolution: drink less… and quit smoking… and quit talking total nonsense to strangers… actually, quit talking, full stop.

Bridget: The only thing worse than smug married couple; lots of smug married couples.

220px-BridgetJonesDiaryThe novel: where it all began-

Amazon Review

In the course of the year recorded in Bridget Jones’s Diary, Bridget confides her hopes, her dreams, and her monstrously fluctuating poundage, not to mention her consumption of 5277 cigarettes and “Fat units 3457 (approx.) (hideous in every way).” In 365 days, she gains 74 pounds. On the other hand, she loses 72! There is also the unspoken New Year’s resolution–the quest for the right man. Alas, here Bridget goes severely off course when she has an affair with her charming cad of a boss. But who would be without their e-mail flirtation focused on a short black skirt? The boss even contends that it is so short as to be nonexistent.At the beginning of Helen Fielding’s exceptionally funny second novel, the thirtyish publishing puffette is suffering from postholiday stress syndrome but determined to find Inner Peace and poise. Bridget will, for instance, “get up straight away when wake up in mornings.” Now if only she can survive the party her mother has tricked her into–a suburban fest full of “Smug Marrieds” professing concern for her and her fellow “Singletons”–she’ll have made a good start. As far as she’s concerned, “We wouldn’t rush up to them and roar, ‘How’s your marriage going? Still having sex?'”

This is only the first of many disgraces Bridget will suffer in her year of performance anxiety (at work and at play, though less often in bed) and living through other people’s “emotional fuckwittage.” Her twin-set-wearing suburban mother, for instance, suddenly becomes a chat-show hostess and unrepentant adulteress, while our heroine herself spends half the time overdosing on Chardonnay and feeling like “a tragic freak.” Bridget Jones’s Diary began as a column in the London Independent and struck a chord with readers of all sexes and sizes. In strokes simultaneously broad and subtle, Helen Fielding reveals the lighter side of despair, self-doubt, and obsession, and also satirizes everything from self-help books (they don’t sound half as sensible to Bridget when she’s sober) to feng shui, Cosmopolitan-style. She is the Nancy Mitford of the 1990s, and it’s impossible not to root for her endearing heroine. On the other hand, one can only hope that Bridget will continue to screw up and tell us all about it for years and books to come. —Kerry Fried

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

Bridget: You once said you liked me just as I am and I just wanted to say likewise. I mean there are stupid things your mum buys you, tonight’s another… classic. You’re haughty, and you always say the wrong thing in every situation and I seriously believe that you should rethink the length of your sideburns. But, you’re a nice man and I like you. If you wanted to pop by some time that might be nice… more than nice.

Mark Darcy: Right, crikey.

Most Favourite quote!

Mark Darcy: I like you, very much.

Bridget: Ah, apart from the smoking and the drinking, the vulgar mother and… ah, the verbal diarrhea.

Mark Darcy: No, I like you very much. Just as you are.

and then she goes and ruins it by killing off Mark Darcy. piff!

Thank you for reading

xxxx

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